Wimbledon 2017 | Britwatch Prediction Challenge Cup

 

By Britwatch Team & Special Guests

  • The Britwatch tennis writers and special guests get together to chance their arm on now legendary Prediction Challenge Cup
  • Special Guests: Adam Addicott (UbiTennis UK), Marianne Bevis (The Sport Review), Abigail Johnson (The Tennis Journal), Chris Oddo (Tennis Now), Michael Stafford-Jones (Tennis View)
  • Representing Britwatch Sports – Ros Satar, Jake Davis
  • BRING IT ON.
LONDON, UK – Crack out the Pimms, get the strawberries in, and keep hat brolly to hand – It’s time for Wimbledon and of course the Britwatch Prediction Challenge Cup.

Wimbledon 2017 – The Predictions

ATP WTA
Champion Dark Horse Shocker Champion Dark Horse Shocker Brits
Ros (15) Federer (5) Medvedev Thiem (1) Kvitova Azarenka (1) Svitolina (2) Konta R4

Watson R2

Broady R2

Boulter R1

Robson R2

Murray SF

Edmund R2

Bedene R1

Norrie R1

J Ward R1

A Ward R1

Klein R1

Adam (14) Federer (5) Sugita Thiem (1) Ka. Pliskova Azarenka (1) Svitolina (2) Konta R4

Watson R2

Broady R2

Boulter R1

Robson R2

Murray SF

Edmund R2

Bedene R1

Norrie R1

J Ward R2

A Ward R1

Klein R1

Marianne (14) Federer (5) Medvedev Thiem (1) Ka. Pliskova Kontaveit Svitolina (2) Konta R4

Watson R3

Broady R1

Boulter R1

Robson R2

Murray SF

Edmund R3

Bedene R1

Norrie R1

J Ward R2

A Ward R1

Klein R1

Abigail (16) Federer (5) Thompson Raonic Kvitova Barty Kerber (3)  Konta R2

Watson R3

Broady R2

Boulter R1

Robson R1

Murray QF

Edmund R2

Bedene R1

Norrie R1

J Ward R1

A Ward R1

Klein –

Chris (13) Federer (5) Tipsarevic Thiem (1) Kvitova None picked V Williams Konta QF

Watson R2

Broady R2

Boulter R1

Robson R1

Murray QF

Edmund R2

Bedene R1

Norrie R1

J Ward R1

A Ward R1

Klein –

Michael (15) Federer (5) Thompson Berdych Ka. Pliskova Kontaveit Kerber (3) Konta R4

Watson R3

Broady R2

Boulter R1 

Robson R2

Murray SF

Edmund R2

Bedene R1

Norrie R1

J Ward R1

A Ward R1

Klein R1

Jake (15) Federer (5)  Medvedev Thiem (1) Ka.Pliskova Mertens Halep (2)  Konta R4

Watson R2

Broady R2

Boulter R1

Robson R2

Murray QF

Edmund R2

Bedene –

Norrie R1

J Ward R1

A Ward R1

Klein R1

 

Ros Satar – Britwatch Sports

The grass season might be short, but what drama we have already seen. Two Czechs picking up the prizes – Petra Kvitova in Birmingham and Karolina Pliskova – by heart goes with Kvitova (although the head frowns). While I have followed the herd like the rest, and gone for Roger Federer to win, I would not cry if Novak Djokovic came and snaffled the win – he is the most in form coming into this tournament.

I would love to be proved wrong and to see Andy Murray defend his title, but I just think the tennis gods want their Federer rolling on the floor like a girl who has just met One Direction. Are they still a thing? No? Well he is still going to win anyway.

 

Adam Addicott – UbiTennis UK

I believe Federer will win an eighth title at Wimbledon. Ever since he returned to action in January, Wimbledon has been his main focus. He has modified his schedule to give himself the best chance to win the event and recently won the Halle Open (again). In the women’s section, Pliskova is the main title contender. Even though her record at the tournament is poor, her talent on the grass speaks for itself. Furthermore, she has gained a lot of confidence from her run to the French Open semifinals on what is her weakest surface.

Regarding upsets in the tournament, Dominic Thiem has been far from convincing in his two previous tournaments. I rate him as one of the hardest working players in the entire sport, but grass is not his strong point. Set to start against Vasek Pospisil followed potentially by Gilles Simon, it is not going to be easy for the Austrian. Meanwhile Elina Svitolina faces threats from the onset with Ashleigh Barty posing a massive challenge. Also with injury doubts surrounding her, I am not convinced that she will make it into the second week.

As for the dark horses, Japan’s Yuichi Sugita enters the tournament after winning both Challenger and ATP titles on the grass. Meanwhile, Victoria Azarenka poses as a threat to everybody if she is on form.

 

Marianne Bevis – The Sport Review

ATP Champion – Heart says Federer, draw say Murray. But this could just be the time Djokovic turns his year around. With the likes of Andre Agassi and, even better, Mario Ancic, recruited to his corner, that timely win in Eastbourne, and fewer than usual expectations, I think his draw could also open up. Juan Martin Del Potro is not 100 percent, Feliciano Lopez has played a lot of tennis, Gael Monfils, well… Thiem has lost both opening grass matches—leaving Federer. Oh go on then, let the heart rule: Roger to win.

WTA Champion – Again the draw plays a part here—and grass form. Pliskova has that extra incentive of No1 on the horizon, has avoided Venus Williams and Kvitova quarters, has the game for grass, and now perhaps the head too. Heart again goes elsewhere: Who doesn’t want Petra to surge back? But I think it’s too much too soon.

ATP Dark Horse – Frankly I don’t think a non-seed stands an earthly. I’d have picked Karen Khachanov except he crept in at the last minute! So a wild stab at one of the other youngsters: Daniil Medvedev. He has put together some decent wins on grass, though he, like my other young pick, Stefanos Tsitsipas, has a killer first week to negotiate.

WTA Dark Horse – Can we call Azarenka a dark horse despite being unseeded? Well I say yes. Were it not for her, I might pick CiCi Bellis, but this is a very tough section of the draw prime for upsets. Laura Robson and Genie Bouchard are here too. Perhaps because of the draw, then, I’ll plump for Anett Kontaveit.

ATP Shock Exit – Where to start? Del Potro? Tomas Berdych? Several have tough openers, but going for Thiem. Pospisil is big and dangerous on a good day, Thiem has been floundering on grass thus far.

WTA Shock Exit – Svitolina: does she still have a foot problem? Certainly no grass prep, and opens against dangerous Barty.

 

Abigail Johnson – The Tennis Journal

My one concern is that skipping the clay court season could pile the pressure back on Federer, who has been producing phenomenal tennis whilst telling himself – and the world – that he has nothing to lose. Still, he held match point in his only two losses of the season so far. Nadal has a shot and Djokovic is finally improving, but it would be ludicrous not to back him.

The women’s tour remains a vast sea of unpredictability. Heading into Paris, Simona Halep had strung together the most consistent non-Serena WTA showings since Azarenka won the Indian Wells/Miami double, and she still couldn’t get the win. So this is a guessing game where the clues are often red herrings, yet I’ll half-heartedly back Kvitova (with Venus also high on my list.)

Admittedly, Angelique Kerber showed some improvement in Eastbourne – but her game and her mentality are so fragile right now, it doesn’t take much. She’ll probably end up in the semi-finals now, but in reality, even a first round departure would not be surprising.

I was close to picking the two world no. 1’s as my Shock Exits. Nevertheless, however dire his form looks, Murray always seems to scrape through close early-round matches – especially at Wimbledon. Milos Raonic has far from the toughest draw, but he’s been injured and lacking in match play. And breakout stars of the previous year struggle to back it up.

Jordan Thompson is a decent player, with a good recent win over Murray and a promising draw. I’ll take him.

I considered the out-of-form Monica Puig, former Wimbledon finalist Sabine Lisicki and aggressive Maria Sakkari for WTA Dark Horse. Birmingham finalist Barty is a massive risk, given that she opens against no. 4 seed Svitolina. But if the Aussie gets that upset, the draw is ripe for her to go deep.

 

Chris Oddo – Tennis Now

So here is how I see it. Nobody can stop Federer and this Wimbledon will mark his 19th and final Grand Slam title. He will be the first male not to drop a set at SW19 since b in 1976. He’ll only be taken to two tiebreakers winning them both. On the women’s side Petra will dazzle, saving match point against Ana Konjuh in the semis before defeating Pliskova 7-6, 6-7, 14-2 in the final.

It’s going to be a very special fortnight, if you get my drift.

 

Michael Stafford-Jones – Tennis View

ATP: Champion: Roger Federer

If Murray was in good form, I would pick him. However, Federer has had such a stellar year, winning the Australian Open and the Sunshine Double and only losing two matches so far, that I cannot, at this moment, imagine anyone else winning the title. If the Swiss maestro had struggled at Halle, I might have had doubts, but he stormed to victory in the final and looks well set for SW19.

ATP Shock Exit: Tomas Berdych

The Czech’s performances on the ATP tour have been getting steadily worse and he finds himself in a tricky section of the draw. He will probably come through his first-round encounter with Jeremy Chardy and will also be the favourite in the second round against either Ryan Harrison or rising star Borna Coric (though he could lose at this point). However, he is likely to lose his third-round match against expected opponent Richard Gasquet, who has a good record at Wimbledon.

ATP Dark Horse: Jordan Thompson

The Australian has had a decent year so far and pulled off the biggest win of his career at Queen’s when he beat Murray. He has landed a favourable draw at Wimbledon against 25th seed Albert Ramos-Vinolas, who has an awful 4-13 win-loss record on grass in his career. If he beats the Spaniard, Thompson will then face either a qualifier or lucky loser. He will likely win that second-round match and earn a place in the last 32, where he will probably face Raonic and lose.

The Brits:

Despite his hampered preparations, Murray should go far at SW19. He should emerge victorious from a second round test against Dustin Brown, a fourth round clash with Lucas Pouille or Nick Kyrgios and a quarter-final versus Stan Wawrinka or Jo-Wilfried Tsonga. But he will lose a semi-final against Rafael Nadal or Marin Cilic if he is not on top form. Of the other Brits, Kyle Edmund will almost certainly beat Alex Ward, but the rest are likely to lose at the first hurdle. If James Ward had more match practice under his belt, he could beat Marcos Baghdatis.

WTA Champion: Karolina Pliskova

After coming close in the last three Grand Slams, this year’s Wimbledon seems like the perfect opportunity for the tall Czech to deliver on her promise and claim her maiden Grand Slam title. Pliskova has been very consistent in 2017, winning two titles (it could be three by tomorrow) and reaching at least the quarter-final in nine of the 12 events she has entered. There are a couple of dangerous floaters in the World No.3’s section – Magdalena Rybarikova and Julia Goerges – but it is an otherwise very favourable draw for her. Pliskova’s biggest tests could come in the quarter-final against Kristina Mladenovic or Coco Vandeweghe and in the final against Venus or Kvitova.

WTA Shock Exit: Angelique Kerber

The World No.1 showed a little bit of improvement in Eastbourne but she still looks a long way off the player who won two Grand Slams in 2016. It will be very difficult to live up to her seeding and she could lose as early as the third round if Lucie Safarova is fully fit and firing. If Kerber makes it to the fourth round, she could struggle against Garbine Muguruza, and a potential quarter-final against Svetlana Kuznetsova might be very tough for her. If the German gets to the semi-final, the in-form Pliskova will surely beat her.

WTA Dark Horse: Anett Kontaveit

The big-hitting Estonian is enjoying the best year of her career. She won the Hertogenbosch title and reached the final in Biel and quarter-finals in Rome and Stuttgart. She has a favourable draw too, with Lara Arruabarrena first, then Daria Kasatkina (who is short on match practice) up next. To go further than the third round, Kontaveit may have to beat Caroline Wozniacki, but she has the ability to do that and, if she does, who knows how far she could go?

The Brits:

Johanna Konta’s quest for an excellent Wimbledon run may have to wait at least another year because she has been handed a very difficult draw. Even if she gets revenge on Nottingham conqueror Donna Vekic in the second round, she will almost certainly lose to two-time SW19 champion Kvitova in the last 16. The draw has been kinder to Heather Watson, who should beat lower-ranked Maryna Zanevska with ease. I fancy her to spring an upset against Anastasija Sevastova in the second third, and then lose to Elena Vesnina or Cici Bellis in the third round. Favourable openers could allow Naomi Broady and Laura Robson to reach the second round, but that is probably as far as they will go. Christina McHale will be too good for Katie Boulter.

 

Jake Davis – Britwatch Sports

ATP Champion – Roger Federer. Federer is fresh off a ninth title win in Halle and now that Andy Murray is struggling with a hip problem, it looks like Federer is in pole position to pick up his second Grand Slam title of the season, which is astonishing.

ATP Dark Horse – Daniil Medvedev. The Russian has the game that is befitting to a grass court, but faces the No.5 seed Wawrinka in the opening round. If Medvedev can get through that first round I think he’ll be one to look out for over the fortnight.

ATP Shocker – Dominic Thiem. Thiem recently lost in his opening match in Antalya to someone ranked outside the Top 200 and he’s rarely brought his phenomenal clay court form into the grass court swing, so I don’t expect him to be around for the second week at this year’s Wimbledon.

WTA Champion – Karolina Pliskova. She’s having a phenomenal year and just made the semi-finals of a slam on her least favourite surface. Now she’s on a court she feels more comfortable on and is feeling confident after winning the Aegon International this week.

WTA Dark Horse – Elise Mertens. The progression of Mertens this year is just fantastic to see as not many people have really been talking about her improvement. She won her first WTA title in Hobart this year making it all the way through Qualifying and I feel that if she can get a few meaningful Grand Slam wins under her belt, she can go far here.

WTA Shocker – Simona Halep. Her loss at the French Open Final was an inconceivable loss from that position, which I’m sure will be replaying in the Romanian’s head for months to come. More of the same happened in Eastbourne and I’m not convinced she’s ready to go far at this year’s Wimbledon.

ATP Brits

Murray – Quarter Finals. It’s hard to predict how Murray will respond to the hip problem and the lack of matchplay, but if anyone can grind his way through an arduous first week of a major then it is Murray, but I do feel he will come up short in the latter stages.

James Ward – R1. I think the wildcard Ward will fall in the first hurdle to Marcos Baghdatis, who has had some very good results at Wimbledon in years gone by.

Kyle Edmund R2. Edmund prefers the clay and has never won a match at Wimbledon, but this time I think he will go one round further and bow out in the second round.

Cameron Norrie R1. He made a fabulous effort in Eastbourne, but beating Tsonga is a tall order for the inexperienced Norrie.

Brydan Klein R1. Klein’s first round opponent is Yuichi Sugita, who doesn’t have the biggest of games, but has just won the Antalya tournament, so will be tough to beat in the first round.

Naomi Broady R2. I think Broady can win a round at Wimbledon this year and she looks in fine spirits after a good start to her grass court campaign, particularly in Manchester.

Heather Watson. R2. Watson looked very good in Eastbourne by reaching the semi-final, which was her best result on tour for over a year, but I think she will lose to Mallorca winner Anastasija Sevastova in the second round.

Laura Robson. R2. Robson’s struggles with a wrist injury kept her away from the sport for quite some time, but I really think she can win her first Grand Slam match in over four years.

Johanna Konta – R4. Konta’s draw is very tough. She has Hsieh in the first round, who beat her in Roland-Garros and potentially Donna Vekic, who got the win over Konta in Nottingham. I see her journey ending at the hands of Kvitova in Round 4.

No Replies to "Wimbledon 2017 | Britwatch Prediction Challenge Cup"


    Got something to say?

    Some html is OK